Disaster Risk Reduction, GIS, Mapping

COVID-19: Using Geospatial Resources to Understand the Potential Impact on Our Communities.

On Tuesday March 17, 2020 with a cancelled celebration of St. Patrick’s Day, Montserrat received the dreaded news of its first confirmed case of novel coronavirus COVID-19. For many of us that is when the gravity of this situation hit home, literally!

The Ministry of Health and Social Services (MoHSS), in their press release (http://www.gov.ms/first-case-of-new-coronavirus-covid-19-confirmed-in-montserrat/), reminded members of the public to adhere to the following risk mitigation measures:

  1. Refrain from public gatherings
  2. Maintain social distance and
  3. Wash hands regularly with soap and water or using a hand sanitizer.
  4. Limit non-essential travel

In addition, to the guidelines provided above, the utilization of geospatial services and resources can help prepare, manage and deliver an effective response to COVID-19.

President of Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI), Jack Dangermond in a letter addressed to its users, highlighted some steps that can be followed in order to understand the potential impact that COVID-19 can have on our community. Five are outlined below:

  1. Map the Cases – map confirmed cases, deaths and recoveries in order to identify where COVID-19 infections exist and have occurred.
  2. Map the Spread – Time enabled maps can reveal how infections spread over time and where interventions can be targeted.
  3. Map Vulnerable Populations – Mapping factors such as social vulnerability and age can help monitor risk groups
  4. Map Capacity to Respond – Map health facilities, medical resources and employees to understand and respond to potential impacts of COVID-19.
  5. Communicate with Maps – Use interactive webmaps, dashboard apps and story maps to help communicate the situation.

Communication with maps have already been used worldwide to map COVID-19. Webmaps, dashboards and story maps help to visualize the evolving situation.

The dashboard app below, powered by GeoTechVision (https://www.geotechvision.com/) shows the COVID-19 outbreak worldwide. It highlights infections, fatalities and most importantly recoveries.

The story map below details the origins of COVID-19 and gives an account of its geographic spread in an easy to read interactive dialogue.

Communication through map-based dashboards and story maps such as these offers accessible information to people in our communities and around the world eager to protect themselves. These tools improves data transparency and helps authorities disseminate information quickly and effectively.

Lavern Rogers-Ryan is a geospatial consultant specialising in disaster risk management and recovery. She is currently head of the GIS Centre within the Government of Montserrat. Learn more about geospatial services in disasters at www.lavernrogersryan.com.

Disaster Risk Reduction, Mapping

Counting the Population is as Easy as 1, 2, 3 with the Help of GIS

 

My three year old is fascinated with counting. Probably one of the most memorable instances of her enthrallment was her sounding off “1, 2, 3, 4” as a family of sisters occupied the bench directly behind us in church. “Four, Mommy, Four!” she shouted as she also pointed it out on her fingers. Seen from my toddlers enthusiasm, there is an innate nature in all of us to know “how many?”.

Conducted on average, every 10 years, the purpose of a census is to gather information about a population’s housing conditions, demographics, social and economic characteristics. It includes collecting data like age, gender, education and employment. It helps us to answer questions like: how many children in your country have completed secondary education? Or how many 20-year olds who live in a particular area and are unemployed? Or how many people in total live on your island? Basic information, such as these, are important for the purposes of planning, development and the improvement in the quality of life for a territory’s citizens.

Counting the population of any country, regardless of the size, can be seen as a daunting task. Geographic Information Systems (GIS), provides a platform, however, to enable data collectors to be more efficient in locating buildings and ensuring that this intimidating work is made a lot more manageable.

In its last count of the population, the Montserrat Statistics department enlisted the use of GIS in the Montserrat 2011 Population and Housing Census to ensure that the enumeration data collected was as accurate as possible. Some visual representations of the data were produced, such as the map below which shows the usual resident population of 4,922 based on gender (male and female) and region (northern, central and southern).

Source: http://www.gov.ms/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Montserrat-At-A-Glance.pdf

The leader* and the team from the statistics department had a clear vision of how the country should be divided in terms of Enumeration Districts and Areas. Some areas were demarcated using naturally occurring features on the landscape, such as ghauts and mountains, and others were demarcated using man-made features like roads. A total of thirty-six enumeration areas were created and detailed maps were prepared for each area. This allowed the areas to be divided into manageable sections and allowed the data collector, with training in map reading, to be more efficient in canvassing the area. The demarcated enumeration areas now provide a base for the collection of additional data and allows for easy comparison and correlation of datasets in preparation for the 2020 round of censi.

The Montserrat 2011 Population and Housing Census benefited from imagery, which was recently collected in 2010 (see my previous blog at https://wp.me/pa7Lux-7o).  The one-year time difference was considered negligible, allowing for a certain level of confindence in the accuracy of the maps, which were produced. Any missing building footprints were drawn on the map while the area was being canvassed, and then later updated. For any future census activity, access to current imagery will play a huge role in its success. Current imagery can be analysed using tools in GIS which will help to determine changes since the last count. One special way of determining change is to use image classification techniques and compare with previous imagery. Utilising this method, new buildings footprints can be identified and quickly extracted using GIS tools and models.

Furthermore, a census provides data, which is critical for disaster risk reduction. Knowing the spatial distribution of the population and its demographic details is key in increasing a Government’s ability to take appropriate action and reduce the loss of human life. Population density maps provide an outlook to assess risk before and the quantification of a population affected after any disaster.

*This post pays tribute to the late Mrs. Katrina Ryan who was the head of the Statistics Department at the time of the Montserrat 2011 Population and Housing Census in Montserrat. She had an endearing passion for the accuracy of statistical data. May her soul rest in eternal peace.

Lavern Rogers-Ryan is a geospatial consultant specialising in disaster risk management and recovery. She is currently head of the GIS Centre within the Government of Montserrat. Learn more about geospatial services in disasters at www.lavernrogersryan.com.

Disaster Risk Reduction, Imagery, Mapping

Satellite Imagery is A Powerful Visual Aid in GIS and Disaster Response

The earthquake events of August 21, 2018 which shook Venezuela, Trinidad and other neighbouring countries (https://www.usgs.gov/news/magnitude-73-earthquake-venezuela) reminded me that not all disasters can be predicted or come with a warning. Videos which showed the impact of the earthquake quickly filled my social media timeline, causing me to reflect on the training I had undergone as project manager for the International Charter Space and Natural Disasters (https://disasterscharter.org). This organization, once registered with, provides a series of support through the use of satellite imagery to assist in the aftermath of a disaster.

Satellite imagery is a form of remotely sensed data with proves useful in the occurrence of an unforeseen event and provides a powerful visual aid when utilized with a geographic information system (GIS). Disaster risk managers are better able to assess their region’s risk when they are able to compare pre and post disaster images.  This type of analysis enables relief workers to identify changes in the landscape, such as buildings which are no longer standing and roads which are obstructed. It is an efficient way to identify damage and conduct rapid impact and needs assesments. GIS supports the use of satellite imagery to locate damaged facilities, identify the type and amount of damage and begin to establish priorities for action.

As satellite sensors improve, satellite imagery is becoming more useful. One of my favourite places to explore satellite data is the USGS Earth Explorer Portal (https://earthexplorer.usgs.gov/). It provides an interface where one can search the available sensors to see the data that is available for a particular area of interest. The advantage of the USGS Earth Explorer is that it houses data from the Landsat Programme which has a 40+ year track record of image acquisition. It allows for free downloading of data over chronological timelines while providing a long list of satellites to choose from.

Additionally, capturing my interest for hours on end is the USGS Earth Now Viewer (https://earthnow.usgs.gov/observer). This viewer is truly remarkable as it shows the position of the Landsat sensor in real-time. It also gives a visual of the satellite images being collected when the sensor scans the earth.

The Landsat Program began with Landsat-1 in 1972 and Landsat- 9 is planned for 2023. Over the years, Landsat has enhanced the number of spectral bands, spatial resolution and spectral resolution. Landsat 1-3 sensors collected data in only 4 bands and at 60 meter resolution. Over time, this has improved, as Landsat 8 now collects in 11 spectral bands varying from 15 meter to 100 meter.

The Sentinel Satellites of the Copernicus Programme also provide free satellite imagery which can be downloaded at the Copernicus Open Access Hub (https://scihub.copernicus.eu/dhus/#/home). The Sentinel-2 provides some improvement to the Landsat data with sharper imagery of up to 10 meters. Sentinel-2 monitors more frequently with a revisit time of 5 days and captures land changes in 12 spectral bands, each ranging from 10 – 60 meters pixel size. The USGS Sentinel2Look Viewer (https://landsatlook.usgs.gov/sentinel2/viewer.html) allowed me to browse through some sentinel-2 imagery. I found relatively cloud free imagery of Montserrat (shown below) which was acquired on 12th April 2018. This is a plus as cloud-free imagery is not always available due to our location and climate.

With the assistance of a skilled technician, satellite imagery can be utilized effectively in disaster management especially during the response stages. By combining spectral bands and performing image classification techniques the capabilities of remotely sensed data can be fully utilized in disaster management.

 

Lavern Rogers-Ryan is a geospatial consultant specialising in disaster risk management and recovery. She is currently head of the GIS Centre within the Government of Montserrat. Learn more about geospatial services in disasters at www.lavernrogersryan.com.

Disaster Risk Reduction, GIS, Imagery, Mapping

Five (5) things GIS has taught me about Disaster Management

I am no stranger to the impact of disasters having survived Hurricane Hugo in 1989, and witnessed the Soufriere Hills Volcano disrupt everything I knew about life in Montserrat since 1995.

As I listened to the reports on the experience of our neighbouring islanders who were affected by the super hurricanes of 2017, Irma and Maria (which I now simply refer to as IRMARIA), I empathized.  Now as I watch reports of the experience of the residents of El Rodeo, Guatemala in dealing with the eruption of Volcan de Fuego which erupted on June 6, 2018, I am driven to share a bit of how my work can help countries manage disasters better.

Geospatial technologies have improved in recent years and are more efficient and reliable to enhance our planning, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery from disasters.  The majority of data needed for these phases of emergency management is spatial, and once it is spatial it can be mapped and utilized effectively.

Over the years, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has taught me a few things in relation to disaster management. Here are five (5) of them:

1.       Most emergencies don’t allow time to gather information.

2.       During an actual emergency there is no time for guessing or estimating, it is critical to have the right data, at the right time.

3.       Lack of appropriate information leads to poor planning and poor decision making.

4.       GIS provides a mechanism to centralize and visually display critical information during an emergency.

5.       GIS saves time, money and lives!

The road to recovery is often very difficult for anyone faced with loss after the impact of a disaster. Many of us on Montserrat however, built up our resilience as we reflect on the loss of homes – not just houses. We have embraced the challenge of recreating the places we lost. Unbelievably,  the Government Headquarters building in Plymouth was newly constructed and the Glendon Hospital was newly refurbished at the time of the eruption. Personally, I often reflect on the town centre which was thriving and bustling as it created jobs, enhanced livelihoods and held memorable spaces, such as “Evergreen Tree” and the “market” for social interaction.

A specialism in GIS allowed me the opportunity to support recovery efforts by utilizing data and producing maps that helped to manage evacuation paths, relocate families safely to shelters, assist in ash clean-up efforts by tracking progress and by utilizing the output of modelling scenarios to identify future impact areas.  GIS provides a mechanism to forge ahead and recover despite the impact of a disaster. Montserrat is now in a phase of re-development and GIS has contributed significantly to this. I do look forward to telling you more about how GIS can be used in disaster management.

 

Lavern Rogers-Ryan is a geospatial consultant specialising in disaster risk management and recovery. She is currently head of the GIS Centre within the Government of Montserrat. Learn more about geospatial services in disasters at www.lavernrogersryan.com.